Important information

This site uses cookies to store information on your computer. By continuing to use our site, you consent to Steel Media's privacy policy.

Steel Media websites use two types of cookie: (1) those that enable the site to function and perform as required; and (2) analytical cookies which anonymously track visitors only while using the site. If you are not happy with this use of these cookies please review our Privacy Policy to learn how they can be disabled. By disabling cookies some features of the site will not work.


Indygo lets you explore one man’s experience of depression

By , on November 2, 2017
Last modified 3 weeks, 1 day ago

Renowned painter Thomas Perry is a man teetering over the brink of despair. Having eschewed the outside world, he now lives entirely within the cramped confines of his workshop. His only interaction is through letters exchanged with his girlfriend Anna and his psychiatrist. Months pass in misery.

Subscribe to AppSpy on

That’s the cheery concept behind indie publisher Fat Dog Games new point-and-click release, Indygo. The doom and gloom is intentional, though, as this was designed by a small team of Polish artists to provide an insight into depression. You take control of Thomas, solving puzzles using the various objects scattered across his studio. Over the course of the game, you uncover more about his history and state of mind, understanding how his mental illness has impacted both him and those around him. The game has garnered award nominations as well as praise from Poland’s Minister of Culture for raising awareness of depression.

Alongside puzzles to solve, you also have several multiple-choice scenarios, with your decision impacting the ending of Thomas’ story. This means you can take a different course over subsequent playthroughs of Indygo to explore the different endings, with the relatively short length of the game preventing replays from becoming a grinding exercise.

Indygo lets you plumb the depths of one man’s mind whilst enjoying hand-drawn visuals and a changeable story. You can download the game for £4.70 from the Steam store.


Comments