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Falling Fred Review

By , on February 25, 2011


Falling Fred
Download on the AppStore
4 out of 5

PROS

  • Smart-calibration; smooth, accurate movement at most angles.
  • Challenging gameplay; surprisingly deep.
  • Intuitve physics; limbs and so on affect your movement 'correctly'.
  • Universal device executeable.
  • Online 'replay' system.

CONS

  • Limited variety; mostly increasing difficulty and acheivement hunting.
  • Possible memory leak issue; game had to have its process killed to regain smooth performance.
  • Gross-out moments; not for all ages.

VERDICT

While you may get a few funny looks from observers, Falling Fred is still a fun (if gory) game to blast away at when you have a spare moment.


  • Full Review
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Fred... well Fred is a bit of a dingus; I mean honestly... who keeps jumping down a blade and spike filled corridor expecting something different? Fred, that's who. You can try to keep this thick-skulled cretin alive for as long as possible in Falling Fred by Dedalord, however you're ultimately destined to fail, so why not tear off a few limbs while you're at it?

Falling Fred is definitely not for the feint of heart as blood is prone to spray around regularly, but if you're doing your job right you'll not see a drop until the moment before you fail. The tilt controls used to push and pull Fred around the screen are calibrated and tuned perfectly for the task at hand, providing quick dodges if you flick in a direction or delicately sliding around the screen if you tilt slowly. While there's no specific rewards (other than achievements) involved for removing Fred's limbs, removing them will make it easier to see what's coming towards you (and in some cases, easier to maneuver as well).

The visuals are minimalistic, but this serves the game well as hazards are easier to identify when contrasted against the bland backgrounds. What's truly impressive is the way Fred feels as he rolls, flips, spins and otherwise jukes around hazards perfectly depending on how many limbs he has left and whether or not his bones are broken (yes, it's actually that detailed). New difficulties are also unlocked by traveling a preset distance on the lower difficulties, ensuring that players meet at least a basic skill level before moving on to a faster, deadlier challenge.

And the fun doesn't stop when you hit the ground, spike or otherwise explode in to a thousand pieces. A replay system has been implemented to allow players to not only share their latest gory death with friends on Facebook and Twitter, but they'll be able to view them directly at Dedalord's website.

Falling Fred is a simple, yet amusing and mildly addictive time-waster that's far more detailed than first impressions would assume; a guilty pleasure, but expect a few odd looks in public.

Screenshots

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