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Chewie Chu Review

By , on August 1, 2009


Chewie Chu
  • Publisher: Ludigames
  • Genre: Action
  • Released: 1 Aug, 2009
  • Size: 24.4 MB
  • Price: $0.99
Download on the AppStore
3 out of 5

PROS

  • Online highscores.
  • Fast paced gameplay - 2 minute levels.

CONS

  • Trial and error learning curve.
  • No iTunes support.

VERDICT

Developer Alcomi have made Chewie Chu an interesting action puzzle platformer and it's a shame more time wasn't spent testing on people unfamiliar with the game. This is one for the hardcore fans.


  • Full Review
  • App Store Info
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Chewie Chu, published by Ludigames, is a well presented and interesting action puzzle platformer that challenges players with timed levels and physics based solutions - but there's no escaping the fact that it is also a very frustrating game to play.

Your aim is to unlock the exit by moving your worm via slingshot from wherever he's currently anchored into switches, edible bugs etc. A lot of time and patience needs to be given to learning the controls (despite being fairly easy to pick up and play) as learning the game's idea of physics can be a chore. This becomes especially frustrating when your worm encounters physics errors and begins to "stick" to walls while trying to bounce off them.

The game's visual design is definitely a top notch effort with a uniform art design that uses "ugly" cartoony characters. It's especially fun to watch the animated expressions on the main character as he's flung, stung, prodded and stretched in the course of a level. The music can be repetitive, so the lack of iTunes support is yet another oversight despite the relative ease of integration now available.

Early tutorials are easily blundered through and fairly counter-intuitive techniques need to be learned without aid. This leads to unnecessary frustration and an otherwise amazing game ends up being the last one you're likely to open. For fans of trial-and-error learning, Chewie Chu is still worth playing, but it's not a game for everyone.

Screenshots

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