Important information

This site uses cookies to store information on your computer. By continuing to use our site, you consent to Steel Media's privacy policy.

Steel Media websites use two types of cookie: (1) those that enable the site to function and perform as required; and (2) analytical cookies which anonymously track visitors only while using the site. If you are not happy with this use of these cookies please review our Privacy Policy to learn how they can be disabled. By disabling cookies some features of the site will not work.


Veggie Samurai Review

By , on July 5, 2010


Veggie Samurai
Download on the AppStore
3 out of 5

PROS

  • Familiar food-slicing gameplay you may already know and love.
  • Added 'dicing' mechanic with separate combo chain.
  • HD iPad native client available.

CONS

  • A little too 'close to home' with gameplay and modes
  •  Darker atmosphere with sedate palette.

VERDICT

For those who already own Fruit Ninja there's little reason to stray, but Veggie Samurai is still a fun title for those who have yet to purchase either one.


  • Full Review
  • App Store Info
  •  

Without diving head-long in to the debate over what some consider a controversial release, Veggie Samurai by QuantumSquid Interactive is the unabashed vegetable-themed doppelganger to the immensely popular Fruit Ninja. The App Store certainly isn't a stranger to cloned titles, but some certainly tow the line a lot closer than others.

The basic controls of Veggie Samurai remain the same as those for Fruit Ninja, with players swiping the screen to enact brutal vengeance against healthy food items, however if you cut back along those halves you can now 'dice' these pieces for a new combo bonus. A separate chain bonus is provided for managing to continue to slice & dice vegetables, giving players a good reason to be faster and more accurate with their swipes.

The 3D graphics for the vegetables are great, with each item being clear and easy to see and little chunklets spray out as you make your slices, however the background seems out of place with the juice splattering mid-air between you and the wooden sliding doors. There are two gameplay modes to choose from, with Samurai and Harmony mirroring the Classic and Zen modes in Fruit Ninja.

It's honestly hard not to overlook the many similarities between Veggie Samurai and Fruit Ninja and ultimately it feels like QuantumSquid have tried to steal Halfbrick's thunder. While this may leave a bitter taste for some gamers, Veggie Samurai is still a fun game to play and ultimately that's what counts when you put your money down.

Screenshots

Screenshot 1 of 10 Screenshot 2 of 10 Screenshot 3 of 10 Screenshot 4 of 10 Screenshot 5 of 10 Screenshot 6 of 10 Screenshot 7 of 10 Screenshot 8 of 10 Screenshot 9 of 10 Screenshot 10 of 10

Comments

Avatar
Pensketch2 4 years, 5 months ago

I bought Fruit Ninja a week before I saw this for the iPad. I went ahead and bought the HD version of Veggie Samurai, in spite of the fact that they basically copied Fruit Ninja, because they did a really good job. In addition to being able to dice, it allows for multi touch – at least in the HD version. Clones are a part of gaming. How many different games are there based off of Bejeweled? As clones go, it's not a bad one.
For what it's worth, I like this on the iPad as much as I like Fruit Ninja on the iPhone. I would like it if they went on to create modes of their own though. Time will tell.

Avatar
andrew 4 years, 5 months ago

I agree that 'clones' aren't entirely bad, hell look at the FPS genre, it took them long enough to haul their arses back in to gear and try something unique again. But - and it's a big one - while I don't have a big beef against clones, I don't begrudge anyone for being upset about this game. Points go to QuantumSquid for giving a reasonable amount of differentiation (initial release for iPad only, multi-touch support, added gameplay mechanics) - yet no matter how you cut it, this is a title designed to capitalize on the success and work done by others. It's good short-term business, but playing second fiddle can only last for so long :)