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Knight's Rush Review

By , on August 29, 2010


Knight's Rush
Download on the AppStore
4 out of 5

PROS

  • Eight worlds to conquer with three different heroes.
  • Incredibly fun and detailed cartoon artwork.
  • Two endless modes for replayability.

CONS

  • '40 levels' isn't quite telling the truth.
  • Combat has little snap or crunch to the hits.

VERDICT

Knight's Rush is an excellent side-scrolling beat'em-up with just the right amount of action and RPG elements to keep you busy for some time.


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'Knight's Rush' is Chillingo's newest game and an attempt to dive in to the side-scrolling beat'em-up world for their Knight's Onrush franchise. While it's easy to compare the basic idea to something like Castle Crashers on the XBLA, Knight's Rush is decidedly a single-player experience and a unique one at that.

As you begin each new world in the campaign mode you'll be stripped of your levels and must start anew, beating down enemies in the form of flesh and blood creatures and the occasional ambulatory piece of siege weaponry one at a time. Your wanton destruction will reward you with experience which is converted in to skill points for various attributes or magical skills, accumulating in a final show-down against a level boss to collect pieces of a legendary artifact. The controls are standard, with a virtual stick for movement and additional buttons for attacking, jumping and special moves, each of which are extremely responsive.

However, it was harder to get used to the game's rather loose way of managing how you hit targets, with spells, weapon hits and special moves never really having a crunch that feels satisfying. Weapons and effects gracefully slide through the game's deliciously fun cartoonish artwork as though it'd be offensive to actually hit them.

Still, once you get your head wrapped around this odd feeling it's a seriously fun concept and additional endless modes give players some level of competitive play to engage in, making this a joy for any action fan to try.

Screenshots

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