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Crazy John Review

By Andrew Nesvadba, on October 13, 2010


Crazy John
Download on the AppStore
Rating

PROS

  • Action-packed gameplay broken in to quickfire mini-missions.
  • Sharp and beautiful pixel-art designs.
  • Plenty of weapons to unlock.

CONS

  • Small selection of missions.
  • Poor AI on enemies.
  • Requires a lot of grinding for minor rewards.

VERDICT

Crazy John takes a stab at introducing some new and interesting gameplay for twin-stick shooters while playing it safe in almost every other aspect; if it were an ice-cream it'd be vanilla with a bite-sized candy-bar inserted in it.


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Sometimes, just sometimes I just can't let something like this slip by without comment. Crazy John by Triniti Interactive had some of the best potential to become a truly classic twin-stick shooter, but instead it chose to be a Minigore clone and ended up losing its way.

The controls are standard for a twin-stick, with one stick used to move and the other to aim and shoot, while a small row of icons in the middle allow you to select your weapon of choice. Weapons vary in power and general effect, though it is more of a personal choice rather than something that affects the game in a significant way. Humans can be rescued in-between or during each mini-mission and for every five you rescue you'll be rewarded with a giant Mech to blast the zombie hordes to oblivion.

It isn't hard to be upset by Crazy John as the gameplay clearly struggles to be something unique and pits players against multiple short objectives before moving on to more challenging levels. This is ruined by the slow grinding progression only punctuated occasionally by a new weapon and perhaps a new area that isn't a minor edit with a palette swap. And on almost any other day I'd overlook the Minigore inspired visuals and would praise it's clever and clean pixel-art style, but the epic amount of talent behind the art has seemingly been squandered merely for marketing value.

Crazy John grabbed me and threatened to never let me go with its fun, action-packed style, but things quickly fell apart at the seams and left me feeling upset. As twin-stick shooters go it dukes it out with the best of the average pack, but it might leave a bitter taste for some like myself.

Screenshots

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Comments

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FalloutNewVegas 3 years, 6 months ago

Well I really can't say I'm surprised. Most of triniti active games are just copies of other great games. Unfortuan=atly their games are usualy very fiddly with controls and loses most of its appeal for being a copy which makes it nothing compared to the real game. I despise them for this reason and try and stay away from most of their games since I got All-in-one gamebox, But I must say they have come up some great games during their existence and I must admire them for their perseverance.