Important information

This site uses cookies to store information on your computer. By continuing to use our site, you consent to Steel Media's privacy policy.

Steel Media websites use two types of cookie: (1) those that enable the site to function and perform as required; and (2) analytical cookies which anonymously track visitors only while using the site. If you are not happy with this use of these cookies please review our Privacy Policy to learn how they can be disabled. By disabling cookies some features of the site will not work.


Tasty Planet Review

By , on February 14, 2011


Tasty Planet
Download on the AppStore
3 out of 5

PROS

  • Simple, fluid control schemes; provides accurate and responsive movement.
  • Fun and unique 'puzzle' levels to break up the repetitive gameplay.
  • Catchy jazzy background music (possibly a con if it gets stuck in your head).

CONS

  • Repetitive level design; inconsistent progression has you covering the same content over and over.
  • No real alternative gameplay; possibly offset once Game Center is added.

VERDICT

Tasty Planet isn't a perfect adaption of the desktop PC version for iOS devices, but it still shares the same quirky style of the original and makes for a great casual time-waster.


  • Full Review
  • App Store Info
  •  

Tasty Planet by Dingo Games is an adaption of the game of the same name from its desktop PC release. Based in part on the same gameplay concept as Katamari Damacy, you must consume objects that are smaller than you until you grow large enough to consume everything in sight.

Life in Tasty Planet starts off in a petri dish, cleaning up dirt as intended, however it's clear that the inventor of this gray-goo didn't design limitations on what could be consumed and it soon escalates out of control, eventually growing large enough to consume objects outside Earth's atmosphere. You can choose between one of four different control schemes, each of which are designed to be responsive and comfortable to play with. Whether you choose to tilt, swipe, tap or use a virtual stick you'll never feel like your out of control despite the speed at which the gray blob can move.

Regrettably, outside of the first few levels and a handful of alternate levels the game quickly loses its unique flair and you'll have to repeat the same tasks over and over with little explanation as to why. Some levels mix up the gameplay by adding a maze-like puzzle challenge to overcome, but more often than not you'll start each level vastly diminished from the size you attained on the previous level and you'll have to consume a host of objects you've already hoovered up only to shift perspectives ever so slightly once you've completed it.

Medals are awarded for completing each level within a certain time-limit, however unlike the original title there's no listed bonuses for reaching these goals. Game Center support is on the way and should help to provide some replay value that's otherwise missing, though adding in the Casual and Endurance modes from the desktop version would also help.

Although the game lacks some consistency, there's something purely addictive about consuming cities wholesale. If you don't mind a bit of repetition and you're a fan of the Katamari series, Tasty Planet makes for a great time-killer that's fun for all ages.

Screenshots

Screenshot 1 of 10 Screenshot 2 of 10 Screenshot 3 of 10 Screenshot 4 of 10 Screenshot 5 of 10 Screenshot 6 of 10 Screenshot 7 of 10 Screenshot 8 of 10 Screenshot 9 of 10 Screenshot 10 of 10

Comments