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Connectrode Review

By Dave Flodine, on April 6, 2012


Connectrode
Download on the AppStore
Rating

PROS

  • No pressure puzzle gameplay.
  • Satisfying 'bzzt' and crunch sounds upon clearing colors.

CONS

  • The game can misinterpret touches on the 'place' button for moving the block.

VERDICT

An interesting take on the color matching puzzle formula with an almost Dr. Mario-like feel; a relaxed puzzle experience with no time limits and no hassles, just block connecting.


  • Full Review
  • App Store Info
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Now recently Connectrode has been in the gaming press because Shay Pierce the developer, was the one team member of OMGPOP who did not accept employment when Zynga recently bought the company, and this game is partially behind his decision. We just wanted you to know why we're reviewing it, but besides this back-story, the rest of the review is going to focus on the game and whether or not it is deserving of a purchase.

This is a variation on the match three genre. Well perhaps that's not entirely true. In tone it feels closer to Dr. Mario. You still need to match three or more of the same colored nodes together to remove them from the board, but here you're creating connections between them with take up spaces on the grid (and if you're not careful you can block off areas of the board, as the new pieces appear at the top and need to have access to anywhere they're placed). Removing nodes from the board one turn after another will start a streak which will boost your high score, as will the circumstances under which you clear out an entire color (and if you left one block behind that the game had to clear).

The blocks themselves can be placed by dragging or tapping, with tapping the grid where you want to place the block being the most efficient method of placement. Once the block is in position you need to tap once more to confirm placement, and this is the only area the controls falter as sometimes a tap to confirm is misinterpreted as moving the block. With no time limit or stress on completing a level, this isn't a grave concern, but it was noticeable.

All in all this is a very relaxing puzzle game. The visuals and sound effects compliment the experience as you slowly create longer and more elaborate chains to connect nodes together. Depending on your skill level, you can select the difficulty that's right for you, and this is what we would call an elegant time waster. Puzzle fans may wish to give this a look. It's nothing revolutionary, but a good way to wind down with a portable game.

Screenshots

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