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Burger Cat Review

By , on April 23, 2012


Burger Cat
Download on the AppStore
3 out of 5

PROS

  • Smooth animations and clean design; easy to keep track of Burger Cat and all of his actions.
  • Clever combinations of hazards to stretch the use of tools.

CONS

  • Interface lacks obvious features such as the ability to undo actions / placement grids / etc.
  • No real sense of progression; same environment over and over / no rewards for efficient usage of tools.

VERDICT

Burger Cat doesn't feel as tight as Ravenous Games' previous releases, and while it still provides some moments of puzzling fun, they're hampered by the game's limited interface.


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Releasing any new title after the insanely successful League of Evil games was always going to be a difficult thing for Ravenous Games to pull off. Some would find their solution in refining what has come before, but in an act of almost complete defiance of the platforming titles that have come before, Burger Cat demands more from your brain than your reactions.

At its core, the game feels much like a traditional puzzle-platformer, removing the player's direct control of Burger Cat and instead placing them in charge of various tools designed to overcome hazards. The core kit will allow you to create and destroy blocks, while also adding springs and decoys to change Burger Cat's direction - as you progress, more tools unlock and add to the complexity of subsequent levels.

Unfortunately the 'hands off' approach feels very stiff and restrictive in how you approach each stage. There's no way to immediately undo any of your actions, forcing the player to restart the stage entirely after making any errors. This is surprisingly common to encounter as there's no placement grid or confirmation before a tap is registered.

Adorable as Burger Cat may be, it's all too easy to lose a sense of achievement in solving one of its 60 currently available stages as you'll have 'solved' the puzzle, only to be defeated by the dreaded miss-tap.

Although clever at times, Burger Cat feels unpolished thanks to these interface issues as well as a lacking sense of reward in completing the puzzles, even if you do so without all the tools required. For now, this is hard one to recommend for anyone but hardcore puzzle-fans looking to scratch their brain-teasing itch.

Screenshots

Screenshot 1 of 5 Screenshot 2 of 5 Screenshot 3 of 5 Screenshot 4 of 5 Screenshot 5 of 5

Comments

Avatar
PodCubed 2 years, 3 months ago

I think I'll comment here since the youtube comments are... interesting? I definitely agree with the undo button, you can spend so long and with one little mistap you pretty much start again. But I'm sure they will update it though, kind of wishing there was a fastforward button too.

Avatar
andrew 2 years, 2 months ago

Ha yes, the YouTube commentors are generally an unruly bunch, but it's to be expected :)
As mentioned in the review, I get the feeling the game was a bit rushed... such an obvious misstep is indicative of the testing and QA being either skipped or not as rigerously run (as compared to earlier titles).