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Dice Jockey Review

By , on October 25, 2013
Last modified 1 year, 1 month ago


Dice Jockey
Download on the AppStore
3 out of 5

PROS

  • Three modes which all offer unique gameplay.
  • Puzzle mechanic is quite clever.
  • Dice are easy to move around.

CONS

  • Poor tutorial.
  • No music.

 

VERDICT

If you can overcome the poor tuturial and figure out the basics, you might find some enjoyment in Dice Jockey's numerical puzzles.


  • Full Review
  • App Store Info

Whether you play Monopoly, the craps table at your local casino, or a game of Warhammer, we're sure you're all familiar with dice - those little cubes of luck and chance. Dice Jockey takes a little bit of a different tack, demanding you learn the layout of a six-sided die, and use this knowledge to align and match face values to create combos and complete levels.

Dragging a die with your finger will roll it along the game grid. The aim is to line up a series of dice so that they all display the same number on top. For example, three dice displaying the number three will create a combo chain, as will five dice showing the number five. Like the bank value on a domino, the side bearing one dot can be substitutes for another number, letting you complete combos when you're one matching face short.

Does that make sense? We hope so, because the game's tutorial wasn't particularly good at explaining the basics.

In Puzzle Mode, you complete combos to clear the screen. In Timed Mode, dice will drop onto the grid, replacing completed chains. As it takes a fair amount of time to memorise which rotations will give you the number you're looking for, you initially spend a lot of Timed Mode (and Survival Mode, for that matter) rotating dice randomly, hoping that the correct numbers will appear and complete your chain.

Once you understand how the dice move, there is enjoyment to be had with Dice Jockey. It does feel a little unfinished, though - There is no music, and the camera controls leave a lot to be desired. It's quite a unique concept, and the neon dice are fun to move around. But if you're a dice casting pro, you might want to try your luck elsewhere.

Screenshots

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