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Rayman Fiesta Run Review

By , on November 7, 2013
Last modified 1 year, 1 month ago


Rayman Fiesta Run
  • Publisher: Ubisoft
  • Genre: Action
  • Released: 7 Nov, 2013
  • Size: 93.6 MB
  • Price: $2.99
Download on the AppStore
5 out of 5

PROS

  • More varied and challenging gameplay than its predecessor.
  • Those Ubiart visuals are still stunning.
  • Boss battles add a little spice.
  • Perfecting a run is insanely satisfying.

CONS

  • No real need for purchaseable powers-ups.

VERDICT

Even more impressive than its excellent predecessor, Rayman Fiesta Run is a fiercely entertaining kaleidoscope of colour, wit, and wonder. 


  • Full Review
  • App Store Info
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Rayman Jungle Run is a hard act to follow. With its dazzling visuals, tight-as-a-drum controls, and endlessly inventive levels, it set the standard for auto-runners on iOS.

For the inevitable sequel, Rayman Fiesta Run, Ubisoft has pulled Rayman out of the trees and into the kitchen - or should that be 'la cocina'.

You see, this sequel is all about food - specifically, Mexican food. Every aspect of every level has a distinctly Latin flavour. You'll smash pinatas and swing from dangling chillies. You'll bounce off slices of lime and sizzling choritzo. As before, every element is rendered in the style of the console games, automatically making Fiesta Run one of the best looking games ever to grace a touchscreen.

Instead of having you complete four sets of ten levels like in Jungle Run, Fiesta Run has a more relaxed approach to progression. You unlock levels by collecting Lums. These levels then appear on a world map, and can be tackled in any order.

To keep you on your toes, the game is continually throwing different environments and characters at you. One minute, you'll be guiding a miniature Rayman through a kitchen populated with fire-breathing lizard chefs; the next, you'll be shepherding his frog-like buddy Globox through a cocktail-themed ice maze.

All this eye candy is tied together with the same responsive tap-based control system which made the first game such a joy to play. As you venture further into the game, Rayman and his friends will reacquire their punching, flying, and wall-running abilities. These skills not only allow you to complete new levels,  they also let you revisit and perfect previous runs with a fresh skillset. Collect all the Lums and you'll unlock a harder version of the level, reworked with extra spikes and nasties.

As with Jungle Run, the aim is not to reach the end of the level, but to max out that Lum counter, a challenge which never seems to get old. Whether you're charging through the guts of a flame-belching lizard or legging it away from a giant mechanical skull on legs, every stage is a kaleidoscope of colour, wit, and wonder.

In keeping with the current fashion, Fiesta Run does have an economy, letting you purchase power-up before levels, and unlock art and characters. While you can top up your Lum balance with real cash, Lums are plentiful, and prices are low enough that you'll never need to put your hand in your pocket.

Far from knocking out a smash and grab sequel riddled with IAPs, Ubisoft has made Rayman Fiesta Run a richer, more expansive adventure than Jungle Run. Every aspect of the game is fizzing with creativity and manic energy, and every Lum demands to be collected. We love it, and you should too.

Screenshots

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Comments

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LEGOrookie 1 year, 1 month ago

Should I get this even if I have not played Rayman Jungle Run?