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Titanic: Hidden Expedition Review

By , on August 3, 2009


Titanic: Hidden Expedition
Download on the AppStore
3 out of 5

PROS

  • Easy to pick up and play.
  • In game support for iTunes playlists.

CONS

  • Quickly becomes fairly repetitive.
  • Some objects are less hidden, more obscured.

VERDICT

Big Fish Games have many more hidden object games in their library that are worth trying once they hit the iPhone, but Hidden Expedition is still interesting, if not their best foot forward.


  • Full Review
  • App Store Info
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Where's Wally has come a long way and hidden object games are now almost a genre in their own right, with games by the dozen making use of cleverly hidden objects to tease their players. Titanic: Hidden Expedition by Big Fish Games is the first of four games in the Hidden Expedition series and will have you tearing your hair out as you try to find that one last object.

You search for objects in each room scrolling and zooming the screen with a drag or a pinch, with items being selected by a simple tap. That's really all there is to the game, with most of the onus being on the player to use their keen eyesight and sharp wit to spot the listed objects.

Like a lot of hidden object games, the visuals tend to get a bit cluttered on purpose. While this can hide objects you can feel frustrated when the item you've been looking for was only hidden by obscuring half or more of the object by other one - or worse still by the edge of the screen. The artwork is otherwise quite fantastic, but for every cleverly hidden object there will always be one hidden in an abstract way.

This is quite an interesting game, although ultimately quite short if you're observant and quick. It would be a good game for the younger crowd, but the names and objects used can be either complex or abstract which would make it unfair, so it seems the game has missed its natural audience. It's a great little time-waster and would be better received if it was packaged with the other games in the series.

Screenshots

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