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Tiki Towers 2 Review

By , on January 24, 2011


Tiki Towers 2
Download on the AppStore
3 out of 5

PROS

  • Build'em-up and let'em-fall trial and error gameplay.
  • Fun atmosphere and bright designs.
  • Multiple solutions to many stages.

CONS

  • Overly sensitive touch controls; zoom-mode can assist, but does not resolve unintuitive design.
  • Erase area too broad.

VERDICT

Tiki Towers 2 isn't just more of the same if you loved the original, though it's hard to forgive some of the control quirks and random elements that make this more frustrating than intended.


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While gamers await the coming of World of Goo for the remaining iOS devices it's worth exploring the alternatives as you might just find something interesting enough to hold you over. Tiki Towers 2 is the sequel to the original monkey-filled physics puzzler and the madness starts all over again as you attempt to safely wrangle these furry beasts towards each level's goal.

Each level provides an initial set of hook points on which bamboo and other various structures can be built. While in the building phase you are capable of creating large and elaborate constructions, however once the game starts the whole thing is subjected to gravity and more importantly, monkeys. Unfortunately, accurately developing the structures you require can cause you to have an embolism as you suffer through a system that makes it hard to move around the screen without constantly zooming in and out (to prevent creating structures you don't need) and the obtuse requirement to create, then delete pieces from the screen to create advanced designs.

However with practice, the designs become less of a problem compared to the monkeys themselves. What makes Tiki Towers 2 so interesting is the 'AI' that controls each monkey - allowing them to climb and explore the world with freedom in an attempt to collect bananas and eventually escape the level. This, however, adds a random element that can result in perfectly valid solutions failing as multiple monkeys bounce up and down on a single area, breaking it apart in the process, only to have it work as intended on another attempt with no changes at all.

There are currently 30 levels to explore and you'll need to come up with multiple solutions to several puzzles to branch out and see them all. It's a shame the controls get in the way of an otherwise fun puzzler, but Tiki Towers 2 can still be a challenging and interesting experience if you're willing to invest some time in to it.

Screenshots

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Comments

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Nexus 3 years, 11 months ago

Personally, I did not find the controls to be "super-sensitve" or paticular tricky compared to other touch games out there, but that's probably a matter of taste - I think. :)

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Nexus 3 years, 11 months ago

To the reviewer of this game.
Reg. following things brought up in review as negatives:
- Dragging to build and move constantly conflicts.
- Unable to accurately position sturctures; especially near two competing hook points.
If you had read the instructions and paid attention to the on-screen messages you would know that it is possible to enable a "magnifier" (pause -> Option), which makes it easy to accurately position structures. And that you should use two fingers to scroll around the playfield, and not just one. :) 

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andrew 3 years, 11 months ago

But see, this is the problem - neither of these are intuitive when the game sets itself up as being capable of easily creating these whacky and interesting structures.
 
The two-fingered drag still resulted in problems as the single finger controls and the zoom function are super-sensitive. Lifting fingers a fraction before the other would initiate a build order or move the screen again or even zoom in/out. This is hardly optimal for quickly and easily shifting the screen to make a small edit on a build.
 
I'll reword the cons to a single, clearer one :)