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Harry the Fairy Review

By Dave Flodine, on March 19, 2012


Harry the Fairy
Download on the AppStore
Rating

PROS

  • Really tight tilt controls.
  • A very odd world full of radioactive keys to open doors and all kinds of industrial machinery.
  • Relaxing music.

CONS

  • A little slow paced for some.

VERDICT

Mostly aimed for younger players with its cute and expressive protagonist, Harry the Fairy will amuse with tight tilt controls and the relaxing, floaty feel of its gameplay.


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Nature vs industry has been a very common theme in many stories across many mediums, but somehow it gains even more emphasis when there's no setup, and only through playing the game and witnessing what is going on, does a theme begin to form.

Harry the Fairy spends each level flying around a cavern trying to free one of his fairy friends who has been captured. Along the way there are stars to collect, hazards to avoid, and small puzzles to overcome. Harry is controlled completely by tilting the iPhone (which the game recommends, with a recommendation of an included virtual joystick if you have the iPad version). The tilt controls are very precise and you'll never have a problem navigating around the cavern depths.

In your way are drills, pistons, rotating saw blades, and all manner of contraptions such as fans that whisk you away, and doors that can only be open with a small radioactive ball. Leading these glowing orbs towards the doors constitutes the majority of the game's puzzles, with antenna being moved to guide the balls down a new path, or the pistons shooting them across a level.

Harry himself is amusing and expressive, and the backgrounds exude a certain charm. The music relaxes, and some of the ambient sounds like the waterfall complete the effect. Now this game is probably meant for younger players, but with controls such as these and some clever uses of machinery, older players will probably gain some enjoyment out of this title as well.

Screenshots

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