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[UPDATED] Nimble Quest Review

By , on April 3, 2013


Nimble Quest
Download on the AppStore
4 out of 5

PROS

  • Turns Snake into an RPG.
  • Lots of interesting power-ups to add variety to the game.
  • Coin acquisition and progression is decent.

CONS

  • Could be a little basic for some.
  • The game gets you addicted to using tokens.

VERDICT

While nothing too deep, Nimble Quest is a lot of fun as its throwing RPG upgrade elements onto the game of Snake, which everyone should be all too familiar with.


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When it comes to the freemium model, Nimblebit are one of the better developers at offering unique and interesting game experiences with a no cash up front policy, and thankfully their games aren't too inundated with in-app purchases or wasting your time as a gamer. Their latest effort Nimble Quest takes the foundation of the ever popular mobile experience, Snake, and turns it into a simple roleplaying game, albeit one that is more interested in lining up heroes than leveling one up (although it includes that too).

Just like Snake, your hero cannot hit the side of the level, any obstacles placed in its way, or any enemies. The enemies will appear and when your hero gets close to them, it will automatically attack. Felling these foes will grant you either a gem, a power-up, a new hero which will join your conga line as well as fill up the experience bar up the top of the screen. Once this bar is filled, gems will litter the screen for a short while before you enter a new area. All your heroes also have a life bar, so is the enemy shoots enough projectiles at one of them, they will perish, leaving your line somewhat shorter.

Now the gems you collect can be used to upgrade the duration of the power-ups that are granted to you during play, as well as upgrade each hero three times, which improves the speed and power of their offensive output. Now the in-game currency is tokens which the game does a good job at getting you addicted to the use of. You start off with ten, and not only can they be used to start the game off with extra heroes and power-ups, they can also continue a game if you happen to die unfortunately. They're not exactly needed, but Nimblebit have done a good job at communicating their usefulness to the player, and it's not hard to see some forking over some cash to keep their supply topped up.

With charming pixel graphics and great music each new level to enjoy, Nimble Quest is such a simple premise executed well, it'd be enough to recommend a play on that alone, but being a free game, and having the developers extol the virtues of their in-game currency rather than berate the player into spending money goes a long way in creating a positive response among players.

Screenshots

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Comments

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nagash 1 year, 3 months ago

I think it deserves a 5 rating. The fremium mechanic is flawless like you said, but that game is a complete retro experience - not only the graphics, like most modern pixel games.