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Boson X Review

By , on September 30, 2013
Last modified 1 year ago


Boson X
Download on the AppStore
4 out of 5

PROS

  • Incredibly addictive.
  • Little variations on the main theme keep things fresh.
  • Chasing your own high score is exhilerating.

CONS

  • Success can be a little to dependant on luck.

VERDICT

An enjoyable score-chasing auto-runner that will delight and frustrate simultaneously.


  • Full Review
  • App Store Info
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You might have heard that the scientists of CERN are busy smashing atoms together at unbelievable speeds in order to witness what happens upon collision.

But the scientist in Boson X takes the dedication to his craft one step further by placing himself directly into the machine.

While the game is an endless runner in the style of Temple Run, the developer seems to have drawn some inspiration from Super Hexagon.

The influence to Terry Cavanagh's geometric puzzler is evident in everything from the shape of the tube itself, to the variations on the gameplay with every new particle. There are six particles to discover, and each of these introduces another variation to the basic 'run, jump, and run some more' gameplay.

The aim is to jump onto  blue coloured blocks to increase your speed until you gain one hundred percent charge and break the barrier. Though gaining full charge on a stage is the set goal, the real challenge is to see how high you can push your score.

Tapping either side of the screen will cause your scientist to jump in that direction. Holding your finger on the screen will extend the length of the leap, allowing you to float over gaps and hazards. If you want to jump forward, you apply both thumbs simultaneously.

It can be easy to overestimate your leaping abilities, and find yourself smacking into the edge of a ledge you intended to land on. There is an element of luck involved - sometimes platforms will appear exactly where you want them, sometimes they won't.

Getting decent score can be tough - frustratingly so at times. However, even if the tight corridors and spirals of later stages are stressing you out, it's still satisfying to revist the sedate pace of earlier stages and attempt to beat your score.

Games like Boson X show us that the over-saturated runner genre can still produce a winner every now and then. And, while the hexagonal design may not be unique, it suits the corridor format down to the ground. Provided you're prepared for a challege, Boson X's scientific shenanigans should produce a positive reaction.

Screenshots

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Comments

Avatar
vragal 1 year ago

Great review guys! Loved Boson X. I think this game deserves a perfect score, IMHO. It really stands out against other runners available on the App Store. Cheers!